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Anti-Human CD45RA FITC/CD62L PE/CD3 PerCP/CD8 APC

Anti-Human CD45RA FITC/CD62L PE/CD3 PerCP/CD8 APC

(RUO (GMP))
Product Details
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BD Multitest™
Human
Flow cytometry
RUO (GMP)
Phosphate buffered saline with BSA and 0.1% sodium azide.


Description

CD45RA, clone L48, is derived from hybridization of mouse Sp2/0 myeloma cells with spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized with low-buoyant–density human lymphocytes.

CD62L, clone SK11, is derived from hybridization of mouse NS-1 myeloma cells with spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized with peripheral blood T lymphocytes.

CD3, clone SK7, is derived from hybridization of mouse NS-1 myeloma cells with spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized with human thymocytes.

CD8, clone SK1, is derived from hybridization of mouse NS-1 myeloma cells with spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized with human peripheral blood T lymphocytes.

CD45RA recognizes an Mr 220-kilodalton (kd) isoform of the leucocyte common antigen (LCA). The CD45RA antigen is a member of the CD45 antigen family that also includes the CD45, CD45RB, and CD45RO antigens.

The CD62L antigen, Mr 80 kd, is the leucocyte endothelial cellular adhesion molecule (LECAM). The CD62L antigen belongs to the selectin family of cell adhesion molecules. The CD62L molecule is the human homologue of the murine lymph node homing receptor, MEL 14.

CD3 recognizes the epsilon chain of the CD3 antigen/T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) complex. This complex is composed of at least six proteins that range in molecular weight from 20–30 kd. The antigen recognized by the CD3 antibody is noncovalently associated with either α/β or γ/δ TCR (70–90 kd).

CD8 recognizes an antigen expressed on the 32-kd α subunit of a disulfide-linked bimolecular complex. The cytoplasmic domain of the α subunit of the CD8 antigen is associated with the protein tyrosine kinase p56lck. The CD8 molecule interacts with class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules resulting in increased adhesion between the CD8+ T lymphocytes and the target cells. Binding of the CD8 molecule to class I MHC molecules enhances the activation of resting T lymphocytes.

Preparation And Storage

The MultiTEST™ reagent is supplied as a combination of CD45RA FITC, CD62L PE, CD3 PerCP, and CD8 APC in 1.0 mL of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) containing bovine serum albumin and 0.1% sodium azide. Store vials at 2–8°C. Do not freeze; protect from prolonged exposure to light. Each reagent is stable for the period shown on the bottle label when stored as directed.

340978 Rev. 1
Components
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Description Clone Isotype EntrezGene ID
CD45RA FITC L48 IgG1, κ N/A
CD3 PerCP SK7 IgG1, κ N/A
CD62L PE SK11 IgG2a, κ 6402
APC Mouse anti-Human CD8 SK1 IgG1, κ N/A
340978 Rev. 1
Citations & References
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Development References (41)

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340978 Rev. 1

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