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Anti-Human CD8 FITC/CD56 PE/CD3 PerCP-Cy™5.5

Anti-Human CD8 FITC/CD56 PE/CD3 PerCP-Cy™5.5

(RUO (GMP))
Product Details
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BD Oncomark™
Human
Flow cytometry
RUO (GMP)
Buffered saline with BSA and 0.1% sodium azide.


Description

CD8, clone SK1, is derived from hybridization of mouse NS-1 myeloma cells with spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized with human peripheral blood T lymphocytes.

CD56, clone NCAM16.2, is derived from the hybridization of mouse P3X-63-Ag8.653 cells with lymph nodes from BALB/c mice immunized with immunoaffinity-enriched adult human brain NCAM.

CD3, clone SK7, is derived from hybridization of mouse NS-1 myeloma cells with spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized with human thymocytes.

The CD8 antigen is expressed on the 32-kilodalton (kd) α subunit of a disulfide-linked bimolecular complex.The majority of peripheral blood CD8+ T lymphocytes expresses an α/β heterodimer (Mr 32, 30 kd), while CD8+CD16+ NK lymphocytes and CD8+ T-cell receptor (TCR)- γ/δ+ T lymphocytes express an α/α homodimer (Mr 30 kd). CD8+ TCR- α/β + T lymphocytes can express either an α/α homodimer or an α/β heterodimer.

CD56 (NCAM16.2) recognizes an extracellular immunoglobulin-like domain common to three molecular weight forms (Mr 120, 140, and 180 kd) of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM).

CD3 reacts with the epsilon chain of the CD3 antigen/TCR complex. This complex is composed of at least six proteins that range in molecular weight from 20 to 30 kd. The antigen recognized by CD3 antibodies is noncovalently associated with either α/β or γ/δ TCR (70 to 90 kd).


CD8, clone SK1, is derived from hybridization of mouse NS-1 myeloma cells with spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized with human peripheral blood T lymphocytes.

CD56, clone NCAM16.2, is derived from the hybridization of mouse P3X-63-Ag8.653 cells with lymph nodes from BALB/c mice immunized with immunoaffinity-enriched adult human brain NCAM.

CD3, clone SK7, is derived from hybridization of mouse NS-1 myeloma cells with spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized with human thymocytes.

The CD8 antigen is expressed on the 32-kilodalton (kd) α subunit of a disulfide-linked bimolecular complex.The majority of peripheral blood CD8+ T lymphocytes expresses an α/β heterodimer (Mr 32, 30 kd), while CD8+CD16+ NK lymphocytes and CD8+ T-cell receptor (TCR)- γ/δ+ T lymphocytes express an α/α homodimer (Mr 30 kd). CD8+ TCR- α/β + T lymphocytes can express either an α/α homodimer or an α/β heterodimer.

CD56 (NCAM16.2) recognizes an extracellular immunoglobulin-like domain common to three molecular weight forms (Mr 120, 140, and 180 kd) of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM).

CD3 reacts with the epsilon chain of the CD3 antigen/TCR complex. This complex is composed of at least six proteins that range in molecular weight from 20 to 30 kd. The antigen recognized by CD3 antibodies is noncovalently associated with either α/β or γ/δ TCR (70 to 90 kd).

Preparation And Storage

Store vials at 2° to 8°C. Do not freeze reagents; protect them from prolonged exposure to light. Each reagent is stable for the period shown on the bottle label when stored as directed.

341142 Rev. 1
Components
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Description Clone Isotype EntrezGene ID
CD8 FITC SK1 IgG1, κ N/A
CD56 (NCAM-1) PE NCAM16.2 IgG2b, κ N/A
CD3 PerCP-Cy5.5 SK7 IgG1, κ N/A
341142 Rev. 1
Citations & References
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Development References (27)

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  22. Ortaldo JR, Winkler-Pickett RT, Yagita H, Young HA. Comparative studies of CD3– and CD3+ CD56+ cells: examination of morphology, functions, T cell receptor rearrangement, and pore-forming protein expression. Cell Immunol. 1991; 136:486-495. (Biology).
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341142 Rev. 1

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