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Anti-Human CD8 FITC/CD38 PE/CD3 PerCP
Product Details
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BD Quantibrite™
Human
Flow cytometry
RUO (GMP)
Phosphate buffered saline with BSA and 0.1% sodium azide.


Description

CD8, clone SK1, is derived from hybridization of mouse NS-1 myeloma cells with spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized with human peripheral blood T lymphocytes.

CD38, clone HB7, is derived from hybridization of mouse P3-X63-Ag8.653 myeloma cells with spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized with the BJAB cell line.

CD3, clone SK7, is derived from hybridization of mouse NS-1 myeloma cells with spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized with human thymocytes.

CD8 recognizes an antigen expressed on the 32-kilodalton (kd) α subunit of a disulfide-linked bimolecular complex. The cytoplasmic domain of the α subunit of the CD8 antigen is associated with the protein tyrosine kinase p56lck. The CD8 molecule interacts with class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules resulting in increased adhesion between the CD8+ T lymphocytes and the target cells. Binding of the CD8 molecule to class I MHC molecules enhances the activation of resting T lymphocytes.

CD38 recognizes an integral membrane glycoprotein, Mr 45 kd, with a protein core of 35 kd.

CD3 recognizes the epsilon chain of the CD3 antigen/T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) complex. This complex is composed of at least six proteins that range in molecular weight from 20–30 kd. The antigen recognized by the CD3 antibody is noncovalently associated with either α/β or γ/δ TCR (70–90 kd).


CD8, clone SK1, is derived from hybridization of mouse NS-1 myeloma cells with spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized with human peripheral blood T lymphocytes.

CD38, clone HB7, is derived from hybridization of mouse P3-X63-Ag8.653 myeloma cells with spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized with the BJAB cell line.

CD3, clone SK7, is derived from hybridization of mouse NS-1 myeloma cells with spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized with human thymocytes.

CD8 recognizes an antigen expressed on the 32-kilodalton (kd) α subunit of a disulfide-linked bimolecular complex. The cytoplasmic domain of the α subunit of the CD8 antigen is associated with the protein tyrosine kinase p56lck. The CD8 molecule interacts with class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules resulting in increased adhesion between the CD8+ T lymphocytes and the target cells. Binding of the CD8 molecule to class I MHC molecules enhances the activation of resting T lymphocytes.

CD38 recognizes an integral membrane glycoprotein, Mr 45 kd, with a protein core of 35 kd.

CD3 recognizes the epsilon chain of the CD3 antigen/T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) complex. This complex is composed of at least six proteins that range in molecular weight from 20–30 kd. The antigen recognized by the CD3 antibody is noncovalently associated with either α/β or γ/δ TCR (70–90 kd).

Preparation And Storage

The QuantiBRITE CD8/CD38/CD3 reagent is supplied as a combination of CD8 FITC, CD38 PE (≥95% 1:1 PE:mAb ratio), and CD3 PerCP in 1 mL of PBS containing bovine serum albumin and 0.1% sodium azide. Vials should be stored at 2–8°C. QuantiBRITE reagents should not be frozen and should be protected from prolonged exposure to light. The reagent is stable for the period shown on the bottle label when stored as directed.

341004 Rev. 1
Components
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Description Clone Isotype EntrezGene ID
CD8 FITC SK1 IgG1, κ N/A
CD38 PE HB7 IgG1, κ N/A
CD3 PerCP SK7 IgG1, κ N/A
341004 Rev. 1
Citations & References
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341004 Rev. 1

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